French and Canadian academic and economic exchange programs at the frontiers of immunology and neuroscience [fr]

During a workshop meeting on December 4th and 5th, the University of Strasbourg and the University of Manitoba explored ways to further strengthen their ties.

During a workshop meeting on December 4th and 5th, the University of Strasbourg and the University of Manitoba explored ways to further strengthen their ties.

On this occasion, the possibilities of setting up collaborative research projects, student mobility projects and a double degree were discussed.

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For two days, members of both universities, along with representatives of innovation clusters and businesses from Manitoba and Strasbourg, gathered in the presence of representatives from the embassies of France in Canada and Canada in France. Together, they discussed their respective strengths, potential synergies. These discussions led to the proposal of student and researcher exchanges to stimulate collaborative research projects between French and Canadian teams. These projects will serve as the foundation for a joint training program, the outlines of which will be defined at forthcoming meetings, the first of which will be held in Winnipeg in the summer of 2020.

The University of Strasbourg and the University of Manitoba are both research intensive universities: the University of Strasbourg has been supported by an excellence initiative or IDEX since the first wave of IDEXs in France; the University of Manitoba is one of the 15 most research intensive universities in Canada (U15). These two universities have similar but above all complementary strengths in terms of research topics: major strengths in Immunology in Winnipeg and Neuroscience in Strasbourg. In 2015, at the University of Strasbourg, a neuroimmunology symposium was created and proved to be a major event for students of the Master of Neurosciences and the Master of Immunology. This conference is funded by IDEX and moderated by Dr. Vincent Lelièvre. Since 2017, Dr. Jean Eric Ghia (University of Manitoba - and honorary Consul of France) has been a key contributor to this series of lectures. This collaboration naturally led to the idea of creating a recurrent and major course in neuroimmunology, on a larger scale, and based on the two scientific communities.

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Last modified on 13/12/2019

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